Tumblnoodl

Niti pro Accuritas in Omnia

72 notes

tealin:

The fabulously talented Sydney Padua has been doodling the comic crime-fighting adventures of pocket-universe Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage for a few years now, but recently she got a book deal for an actual dead-tree publication of her work, making me very excited and her very stressed.  Well done, Syd!  You will rock it!

The book is done and is going to be a THING!

tealin:

The fabulously talented Sydney Padua has been doodling the comic crime-fighting adventures of pocket-universe Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage for a few years now, but recently she got a book deal for an actual dead-tree publication of her work, making me very excited and her very stressed.  Well done, Syd!  You will rock it!

The book is done and is going to be a THING!

Filed under ada lovelace ada lovelace day graphic novel sydney padua charles babbage Lovelace and Babbage 2dgoggles

89 notes

tealin:

A party of men from the base at Cape Evans, led by ‘Atch’ Atkinson, went on a last-ditch attempt to rescue Campbell’s Northern Party from where they’d been stranded up the coast, despite the rapidly closing season and dangerously unstable sea ice.  ‘Silas’ Wright, Canadian physicist and glaciologist, had (in Atch’s words) ‘come on this trip fully believing that there was every possibility of the party being lost, but had never demurred and never offered a contrary opinion’ – until they’d decided to turn back.

It’s a really esoteric little corner of the story so I don’t expect people to read up on it (though Silas’ journal is pretty entertaining), but I am still proud of his pose in the last panel so all a yous get to see it again.
The failure to reach Campbell’s party, by the way, is why this comic takes place in an ice cave.

tealin:

A party of men from the base at Cape Evans, led by ‘Atch’ Atkinson, went on a last-ditch attempt to rescue Campbell’s Northern Party from where they’d been stranded up the coast, despite the rapidly closing season and dangerously unstable sea ice.  ‘Silas’ Wright, Canadian physicist and glaciologist, had (in Atch’s words) ‘come on this trip fully believing that there was every possibility of the party being lost, but had never demurred and never offered a contrary opinion’ – until they’d decided to turn back.

It’s a really esoteric little corner of the story so I don’t expect people to read up on it (though Silas’ journal is pretty entertaining), but I am still proud of his pose in the last panel so all a yous get to see it again.

The failure to reach Campbell’s party, by the way, is why this comic takes place in an ice cave.

Filed under Scott expedition silas wright shameless reblog doodle comic

59 notes

tulanoodle:

tulanoodle:

This pretty well sums up the dynamic between me and my sister.

Reblogging because this is about to become a reality! I am taking off on Monday to visit my sister twirlytumblfluff / tealin for a week in London. All you ne’er do wells out there better watch out! 
And a big “hello!” to all you guys who recently followed me over here from her blog :)

This is TRUFAX. And anyone who hasn’t followed her yet, get to it!

tulanoodle:

tulanoodle:

This pretty well sums up the dynamic between me and my sister.

Reblogging because this is about to become a reality! I am taking off on Monday to visit my sister twirlytumblflufftealin for a week in London. All you ne’er do wells out there better watch out! 

And a big “hello!” to all you guys who recently followed me over here from her blog :)

This is TRUFAX. And anyone who hasn’t followed her yet, get to it!

Filed under gpoy not my art

5 notes

Anonymous asked: Im curious-how have you found culture n daily life is different in the uk?

Well, this would take about a week to answer, and would depend if you were American, because if not then I’d have to explain what the background culture is like there before explaining how it’s different here.

4 notes

slipjigstream asked: Do you miss mountains? Or is weather and green sufficient?

Oddly enough I haven’t missed mountains much, which is something considering I’ve had them more or less everywhere I’ve lived. Maybe there’s enough else to make up for them. Weather and green, and good conversation and stimulating attractions and inspiring values go a long way … Occasionally I get a pang for BC, but it’s usually something to do with the great dark dripping forest rather than the mountains.

11 notes

alvadee asked: Oh, questions! Ok, do you like musicals? If yes, what's your favorite? And how was working with Glen Keane? Any favorite memory from that time? :)

I am one of those people who, when I find out something is being made into a musical, I cringe, but I love some musicals A LOT. They are just, sadly, few and far between.

Working with Glen was pretty fantastic, but I was in such a state emotionally and artistically at the time I don’t feel I can really comment on it in any sort of objectively relevant way, as a lot of what made it fantastic was very personal.

Same goes for favourite memories; one that springs immediately to mind was finding Orangie hooked up to the oscilloscope one morning, but that will make no sense to anyone who wasn’t there and was probably heavily influenced by sleep deprivation. :)

15 notes

arythusa asked: How did you come to the decision to move to the UK, and do you have any recommendations for others looking to do the same? Dreaming, perchance??? *grabbyhands at the weather*

I’ve been sort of mentally living here for nine years (Radio 4 addiction), longer if you count my immersion in British literature/history/TV etc, so the decision was, in a way, just letting my body catch up with my mind. Then there was the fact I’d be depressed for months on returning to LA every time I visited here. Really the actual decision itself was made by discovering the UK Ancestry visa was still on offer, which I was eligible for; the work visa and the UK/European animation industry aren’t really compatible. If you’re thinking of living here I’d definitely recommend visiting a few times beforehand and getting a sense of the culture and daily life as it’s wildly different from the States; my Radio 4 addiction gave me a good ease-in so culture shock wasn’t really an issue. If you don’t qualify for an Ancestry visa and don’t have some cunning way to land a work one I don’t know, but if you’re visiting from the US or Canada you get 6 months on your tourist visa, so as long as you’re not doing work for a UK company you can use that time for whatever.

There are places to get weather closer to home — the Pacific Northwest has a very similar climate to here, though a little less exciting in the flocks-of-thunderstorms department. Beautiful, though.

10 notes

Anonymous asked: After going to school for animation, I figured out that I might be a better administrative/production person than animator (or, at least, there seems to be a need that I can fill). How do I even start that kind of career?

The good news is, there is LOTS of need for people on the production end of things who have even a clue as to what goes into animation. The bad news is, I don’t know how you get started in that. Your best bet, I’d guess, would be to contact a studio and find out how they find their production people and what you’d need to do to be desirable. Most animation production peeps learn on the job, it seems. It’ll probably start out with a bunch of photocopying and errand-running, but if you’re organized and capable you’ll rise fast, methinks.

13 notes

baruyon asked: (Assuming you are still in the UK!) How have you found the UK? Are there any major differences between the UK and where you used to live? What are your most favourite and least favourite things about it? (Sorry, haha... I'm really curious as to what other people think of this country 8( )

I LOVE IT AAAAAH I LOVE IT.

No but seriously, everything, it’s just so great, I haven’t been this happy in years. If I were to list everything I love about it I wouldn’t get to answer anyone else’s questions, so instead I will list the things I don’t love:
1. The quality of washing-up sponges
2. Not being able to get tinned clams, like, anywhere
3. Train fares (but I hate complaining about that because at least there are trains!)

Other than that I probably annoy all the natives by being so darn happy about everything all the time. Especially the weather. Nothing like six years in a sensory deprivation chamber to make you very excited when anything happens in the sky.

6 notes

annabelleisapeach asked: What are you reading and listening to lately?

When I had a commute I was re-reading Redwall, which I’d practically lived in during my teenage years. Then I was housesitting a ten-minute walk from work so that kinda fell off. I have a copy of Carpe Jugulum I want to get read this month, should probably start on that … I highly encourage anyone who likes vampire stories and strong female characters to give it a read, it is top-notch.

11 notes

Anonymous asked: What do ya like to do to kick back and relax?

Cycle through Tumblr, BBC news, CBC news, Twitter, and Dreamwidth, in the hope something will have updated in the 10 minutes since I last visited. I really need to find a more productive way of relaxing because that just burns through time, which is a finite commodity.

Sometimes I lie down and listen to Radio 4 with my eyes closed!

This is the rollicking life of a single girl in London, ladies and gentlemen, hold onto your hats.

22 notes

cloakstone69 asked: Thoughts on the 'Fantastic Beasts' film? Any particular magical creatures you want to see?

When it was announced, I immediately pictured a poster of a wizard in ’20s gear facing down some crazy beast in the middle of Park Avenue with all the castley skyscrapers and old cars of early 20th century NY in the background, and realized I had instantly ruined it for myself because my imagination was probably 100x more what I wanted to see than would be the movie that ended up onscreen. I love the idea but am, shall we say, realistic in my expectations. (Still very excited about my hypothetical eccentric British creature-hunting Indiana Jones in 1920s NY though, hot diggety!)

The magical creature I’d most like to see is a movie that holds onto interesting complex characters and a meaningful involving story without getting swept away in an effects bonanza. Hah! Completely mythical.